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Aviation Collectables & Aviation Clothing - Stock Archive - Page 4

These are some of the SOLD items that have been listed on our website

There are a maximum of 20 items on each page - our most recent sale is listed first - this is now quite a large reference record. If you have a specific interest, use our keyword search to search the entire stock database.


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NewStock NEW STOCK In Stock IN STOCK Featured FEATURED Sold SOLD Sold - similar available SOLD - similar available  
Reference Stock Item   Description
3743
Grip and joystick from AT-6 Texan - Click for the bigger picture SoldGrip and joystick from AT-6 Texan - We purchased this set as an unidentified aircraft stick at auction with no idea what it came off. We have subsequently been advised it would have been from an AT-6 Texan and is fitted with a US or Canadian made grip. The numbers stamped on the reverse state 73-61044 and separately IO. The Texan (or Harvard as it was known in RAF service) provided an advanced trainer capability for pilots of the United States Army Air Forces, United States Navy, Royal Air Force and other air forces of the British Commonwealth during World War II and into the 1970s. The grip is in generally very good condition although the paint has been mainly rubbed away. The gun button which seems to be some sort of alloy rather than brass is marked "safe and fire" and the back of the gun button is marked 66-61179-2. The grip cover is in generally good shape but one area of damage but when viewed from the front, it looks perfect. This one came complete with stick which is marked 52 52103 which has also been identified as Harvard. This is in the original paint and is in excellent condition. The bolts to secure the grip to the stick are missing but the holes line up exactly, although we can't say for sure that this stick was used in conjunction with this grip in service. Measures 34" (87 cm)
6021
RAF Aircraft Propeller Tip - Click for the bigger picture SoldRAF Aircraft Propeller Tip - Small but beautifully formed! Painted in the classic wartime colours of RAF aircraft of matt black with a yellow tip this example has clearly been cut from a damaged propeller and taken as a souvenir. Sadly the provenance associated with it has been lost down the years but seems highly likely to date back to WWII. The prop was constructed from layers of wood, glued together, while being compressed to about half their original thickness, before being shaped. Some had the wood encased in a sheath of fine mesh, and all had their leading edges covered by a thin sheath of brass. The whole lot was then covered in a semi-matt black plastic, by makers Rayoid, Rotaloid, or Schwartz. This example is of modest size measuring 7.25" x 6" (19 cm x 15 cm) and would sit comfortably in an RAF associated collection…and significantly cheaper to buy and post than the non-truncated examples we see from time to time!
5207
This is a Used Book
Polish Resettlement Corps Conditions of Service - Click for the bigger picture SoldPolish Resettlement Corps Conditions of Service

An original booklet, marked 'Restricted' issued by the Air Ministry In October 1946 and published jointly in English and Polish. Following the German/Soviet invasion of Poland in 1939 many citizens chose to evacuate their country and fled to Hungary, Romania, France, and finally, Britain. By the mid-1940s some 35,000 Polish airmen, soldiers, and navy personnel reached the UK, making up the largest non-British military force in the country. Of those, some 8,500 were PAF airmen, a resource the RAF were desperately short of in the summer of 1940. At first deemed "suspicious" by the British Royal Air Force, the Polish proved their allegiance by fighting with skill, bravery and determination during the 1940 Battle of Britain and continued to serve with distinction throughout the war.

In 1945 the Yalta agreement sealed the fate of the Poles with the imposition of a Communist Government and the onset of the 'Cold War'. Each of the three services in the UK was responsible for the de-mobilisation and transfer of armed combatants into the Resettlement Corps (PRC)by an Act of Parliament passed in February 1946 and enrolment into the Polish Air Force Resettlement Corps (PARC) started shortly afterwards. The Air Ministry published these conditions of service on 14th October 1946 and listed the choices available to members of PRC to either return to Poland, settle in Britain or emigrate to Commonwealth or other countries.

At the beginning of 1947 some 11,000 Poles 'joined' the PARC. Of these it is estimated that 3,000 Poles from the PAF chose to be repatriated (sadly to a very uncertain future)and another 2,400 emigrated to other countries. Some 9,000 PAF personnel stayed in Britain with at least 5,000 finding civilian jobs. It must be said in view of the dedicated service offered by so many Poles to the allied war effort many were shabbily treated by the British post war including a campaign by the TUC and others and this was not Britain's 'Finest Hour.' The PRC was finally disbanded after fulfilling its purpose in 1949.

This booklet, which is not a reprint, is addressed to all 'Polish Officers, Airmen and Airwomen of the Polish Air Force'. It clearly spells out this little known piece of post war history. In dual languages, as mentioned, the first half is made up of 11 pages and covers all aspects of the terms offered including repatriation options education and training, clothing, and rates of pay according to rank in a pull out section. The second half of the booklet is the same but duplicated in Polish. It remains in remarkably good condition despite its 72 years of age with just minor age related marks to the buff card cover. How many of these booklets have survived down the years is unknown but it represents a very important piece of Polish Resettlement Corps /Polski Korpus Przysposobienia I Rozmieszczenia history that will sit well in either a Museum display or a specialist RAF/Polish collection. This is a one off and is unlikely to be repeated. As with all our listings more detailed pictures are available on request to show examples of the text in English or Polish depending on your disposition!

Pages: 21
Cover: Soft
Author: The Air Ministry

4833
Luftwaffe Late War Flying Boots - Click for the bigger picture SoldLuftwaffe Late War Flying Boots - These boots represent something of an enigma. At first glance they matched fairly closely the pair illustrated in Mick Prodger's Luftwaffe V RAF Flight Clothing reference book bottom of page 150, described by him as: ''Towards the end of the war, quality declined visibly in manufacture of all flying clothing and equipment, and nowhere is it more obvious than in flying boots. These late war boots are made from a patchwork of dyed leather and unfinished suede, the single zip fasteners are made from black plastic, and the metal fittings are crudely cast and shaped from steel or zinc'.

In checking the detail of our boots we noted minor variances between left and right although they came in together and are both named to same chap so have clearly been issued and used as pair. One has an eclectically heated label sewn in although no signs of it being a heated boot but we have noted possible evidence where a heating snap may have been removed. In addition the friction clips on the top leg straps are to a slightly different pattern, as are the snaps. The zips are a matched pair by Ri-Ri of plastic economy style; one features a leather pull tab and the other does not. The last shape is sharper than early war issue boots and the soles are leather rather than the rubber 'Willop' pattern. The other unusual thing is no bottom straps over instep are fitted and in checking the detail no sign of these having been removed. Both boots carry RB number labels and include what we believe to be the owners initials R.B.Y.

We have subsequently discussed these discrepancies with Mick Prodger and between us have come to the conclusion these are probably a pair of reconditioned/reissued boots characteristic of late war production. The Germans, like everyone else, had a shortage of raw materials like rubber and metal by 1944; worn and damaged RAF Irvin jackets were repaired, reconditioned and reissued in just the same way. Sadly we don't have any provenance with the boots but as we have often said if they could only talk they would certainly have a story to tell!

So whilst not an exact matched pair we believe their current condition is as they were used in service in the final stages of WWII circa 1944/45 and would sit happily as such in a collection or on a mannequin. The leather and suede sections are in generally good display condition, the zips are fully functional and the interior sheepskin lining is actually very good indeed. The leather soles and rubber heel tips are sound and do not show excessive wear.

So now you have it. If you like your kit 'mint and boxed' these are probably not for you. If however you like kit that has certainly been well used and representative of service condition in the closing stages of WWII then these could be just the ticket. If of possible interest please drop us a line for a range of detailed photographs that will fully illustrate exactly what we have on offer.
OC450
RAF Aircraft Blind Flying Hood - Click for the bigger picture SoldRAF Aircraft Blind Flying Hood - This one is a first for the team at Oldnautibits HQ! This item came in with a number of other aviation related pieces we are currently listing, recovered from the garage of a retired Tiger Moth pilot. Whilst initially thinking this was the hood from an ancient MG, a little bit of online research confirmed it is in fact an RAF blind flying training hood, probably dating to the 1930's. We have found photographs of similar being fitted to the rear cockpits of trainers such as the DH82 Tiger Moth and the RAF Miles Magister. When the hood is opened up it enabled the instructor to simulate conditions of zero visibility for the fledgling pilot the back seat, whilst the instructor, in the front cockpit keeps his eyes peeled to check the accuracy of the flying and to keep a look-out for other aircraft!

The metal frame of this hood retains much of its original green paint and despite some rust appears to be in sound condition. The canvas and leather of the hood cover itself is in very poor condition but sufficient remains we believe to provide a decent pattern for a replacement hood to be constructed. Alternatively it may be possible to carry out sympathetic repairs or it could be left in 'as found ' condition, to display how basic flight training was carried out in the 1930's, when it was very much 'seat of the pants' stuff! Interestingly this hood has two blackened triangular windows that we have not seen on any period photographs. We speculate these may have been to allow minimal light into the blackout conditions within the cockpit, to aid reading of the basic set of panel instruments whilst preventing the trainee having a crafty visual to see how he was making out! The rear of the hood has 'lift the dot' fasteners to attach securely to the rear of the cockpit frame while the front would have been secured by straps An interesting training aid from a bygone age!

6637
E.Vion Compass Type 112 - Click for the bigger picture SoldE.Vion Compass Type 112 - This little French compass came in in a box of assorted instruments and whilst we have never had the type here before believe it would have been fitted to the instrument panel of light aircraft such as the Fournier RF4 and RF5 & Vivat SDM and no doubt others. The data plate on the case confirms it was manufactured in November 1963 and the guarantee ran out one year later! he serial number is 3856 and it was made by E.Vion of Paris. Interestingly the front of the compass appears to be mounted upside down when compared with the compass card but that is how it came to us. The bolts to locate the rear cover are missing as is the damping oil. So we are offering this modest sized compass as a project or for spare parts and as detailed above it went out of guarantee 55 years ago! Instrument front plate measures 2.4" (6 cm)
5303
'Conyne' Pattern Aerial Kite and Tube - Click for the bigger picture Sold'Conyne' Pattern Aerial Kite and Tube - Another aerial kit we are listing today but this one is proving a bit of a mystery! When purchased it was described as 'for use in conjunction with the Airborne Lifeboat '. Research online does indicates in 1943 the Air Ministry refined the antenna raising system further; they were apparently happy with the 'Gibson Girl' transmitter but the box kite was superseded by a Conyne design which could be rocket launched with the aid of a Very pistol. Whilst our kite looks very similar in shape and design with a lightweight white cotton sail and aluminium struts, they differed from this example as the spars were engineered with a spring system to open the kite in the air after launch. Ours whilst initially similar has to be assembled by hand so we have discounted this possibility. The issue tube is clearly marked 'Assembly and Operation of Hand Flying Kite and Aerial' but the detailed instructions don't really assist with a positive identification as no RAF or other stores reference numbers are shown. Interestingly the illustration (further detailed photographs are available on request) shows a gent in a sailors cap in apparently a wooden craft. We have discussed this conundrum with Mick Prodger and whilst only a guess he wondered if it could have been issued for use by Naval or Merchant Navy lifeboats WWII? To further confuse the situation I remember as a boy in the 1950's being given a similarly designed kite by my Father who at the time was the C/O of the Air Section of a school cadet Force and my memory tells me it was ex RAF. It could always be an Airborne lifeboat kite as described to us but a standard launch example but let's just say the jury is still out!

Suffice to say a rather scarcer pattern than the standard RAF box kite design, as per the mint example we have listed. The condition of this one is not perfect but despite the odd repair and minor damage and some staining to the cloth it remains in remarkably good display condition. The collapsible frame is made from aluminium whilst the front pole to which the aerial would have been attached is hardwood. Interestingly this is considerably longer than the storage tube ; it may be this is not original to the kite or it was packed separately or even perhaps the transit tube has been misplaced with another. So currently we have more questions than answers but if any visitors to the site can clarify the origins of this example we would be delighted to hear from them and we can add new information to this listing. The cardboard and metal storage tube measures 30.5" (77 cm) whilst the kite measured along the main spar is 51" (130 cm)

3152
RAF War Service Dress named to Sgt Anholm - Click for the bigger picture SoldRAF War Service Dress named to Sgt Anholm - Here we list here a matched RAF Battledress blouse and trousers named to the same Sergeant. Sadly we have no history on him other than he clearly served in WWII but without clues like his initials or service number tracking him down could prove a bridge too far. Both the blouse and trousers have good clear labels with the blouse made by Montague Burton Leeds in 1945 whilst the trousers are by John Hammond & Co (1922) Ltd and are dated 1944 and over stamped June 1944. The blouse carries standard rectangular RAF Other Ranks shoulder titles. Below is clear evidence where Sgt Anholm's stripes have been removed as is often the case when uniforms are sold on by the family. It would be nice to have the blouse rebadged but we will leave this to the new owner. The condition of the cloth is way above the average for an original wartime set with just a couple of very small moth nibbles to the back panel but on display these are virtually invisible. All buttons and buckles are present and correct.

The matching trousers are like the tunic, very clean and fresh and despite being made 75 years ago just a couple of moth nibbles that on display do not really detract. The field dressing pocket is of the later button closed type as opposed to the early War flap version. Clearly Sgt Anholm was not a large man with the tunic being as size 2 (Height 5' 2"-5' 4", Breast 34"-35" and Waist 31"). The trousers are a size 1 to fit a Waist 29" and Leg 28.5". So despite its modest size this matched set could form the ideal basis of an RAF Flight Sergeant mannequin or just as a display item in your collection. As with all our stock more detailed photographs are available on request. Genuine matched and named wartime RAF Battledress are becoming increasingly hard to find so grab this opportunity, on offer at a competitive price, whilst you can!

6659
USAAF A-3 Parachute Harness - Click for the bigger picture SoldUSAAF A-3 Parachute Harness - Or to use its full title 'Group 2 (Yellow) Parachute Assembly, Quick Attachable Chest, Type A-3 harness'. This pattern was developed in late 1943 and first saw operational service early in 1944. This example is a really first class replica and whilst used previously in the ownership of a re-enactor is remains in very clean original condition.

Stamped on one of the beige webbing straps, that also feature a central black fleck, is 'Standard Parachute Corp ' and is dated May 1942 together with an AN acceptance stamp in a circle. The buckles and fittings are all made from cast alloy and the harness features the distinctive yellow felt coding to ensure aircrew selected the correct parachute pack from the stores. The A-3 carried the attachment hooks on the harness and the loops were on the pack but to confuse matters on the A-4 the reverse applied so the component parts were definitely not compatible! The set is completed by the correct olive drab pack pad that is nicely stamped 'Back Pad part nos 42D2013 and 'Date of manufacture May 1942' and a further AN acceptance stamp. Originals of these are getting very hard to source now and this is reflected in their price. This replica provides a more economical alternative that will look good dressed on a mannequin or of course for the re-enactor looking for authenticity and it will only improve with usage.
6794
RAF Trench Art 20 mm Shell Case Trench Art Lighter - Click for the bigger picture SoldRAF Trench Art 20 mm Shell Case Trench Art Lighter - An attractive example mounted on a turned wood base with the case then fixed to a plinth that may have been made from scrap Paxolin or similar synthetic plastic material. The Hispano-Suiza 20 MM HS-404 equipped virtually every British fighter aircraft during WWII including later marks of the Spitfire, Hurricane, Typhoon, Tempest, Mosquito, Whirlwind, Beaufighter, P38 Lightning and many more. After some early teething troubles it proved to be an extremely effective weapon in both air to air and ground strafing roles.

This example is in first class condition and the cannon shell itself retains its copper band. The shell case has been sectioned and the top part is removable which then reveals a lighter mechanism fitted inside; we have bought and sold several similar examples over the years. We have not attempted to get this working and we can no longer guarantee its original purpose although it does look complete and the flint wheel still creates a good spark. Despite being completely inert to avoid any issues with customs we are restricting the sale of this item to UK destinations only. Stands 8.5" tall including the base (22 cm)

6739
RAF K Dinghy Hand Paddles - Click for the bigger picture SoldRAF K Dinghy Hand Paddles - Standard issue with the fighter pilot's K type single seat dinghy in WWII. These were designated with stores reference number 27C/1906 and were constructed from rubber stretched over a simple metal frame.

The user would insert his hands and wrist between the paddle and the elastic retaining bands and use to propel the dinghy through the water. This pair is in issued condition with some staining to one paddle as shown. Both are stamped CQD 1096/3 1 and further stamps reading R.F.D.36;'RFD' indicating this set was made by 'RFD', which represents the company founder Reginald Foster Dagnall, who established the business in 1920. Despite not being in pristine this set gives the impression they have been issued and used so would add a touch of authenticity in an appropriate display and are priced to reflect their current condition.

6676
RNAS WWI Flying Filter Goggles - Click for the bigger picture SoldRNAS WWI Flying Filter Goggles - Probably the scarcest pattern of WWI flying goggles and so few have survived that most museums do not have a set on display and the only other example we have been able to find is part of the Yale Peabody Museum collection in the US. When Mick Prodger published his classic reference work 'Vintage Fling Helmets' he was unable to source a set for inclusion although he has since owned a single pair. It is understood they were experimental when first issued to Royal Naval Air Service pilots in1917. Each set was contained within a custom made wooden case that held 16 coloured lenses (or officially designated "light filters") that were intended to assist with locating and spotting enemy ships and submarines from the air under different conditions. Some were for looking through haze, whilst others were for spotting oil on the surface of the water, or again for locating shadows under the water or even enemy gun flashed over the trenches. The set was completed when issued with an instruction manual giving directions for use and even an address for pilots to write to with their observations as to how these worked in practice!

This superb example is complete and despite being over 100 years old appears to be in unissued condition. It was discovered in a building close to Kalafrana on the southernmost tip of Malta which was a seaplane base between 1917 and 1946, when it was transferred to the Royal Navy. In WWII RAF Kalafrana was home to 228 Squadron flying Sunderland's and remained in use until the 1960's. Clearly these are the flying goggles that time forgot, until recently re discovered. The booklet shows some insect damage to the cover and the staples are rusted but is still readable and indicates a print date of June 1918. The box is sound and as well as the filters currently fitted to the goggles it comes with a further 6 filters thus making up the full set; each pair of filters is numbered and whilst showing some age fading but are undamaged. The goggles themselves are virtually mint and the tan leather is still soft and pliable; the cloth bound edge is fur lined and remains pristine, as are the face pads. The fabric backstrap is complete but has lost its elasticity over the last 100 years and now needs to be handled carefully. The strap is marked in pencil with a 'K' and the metal clip and adjustment clip are rust free.

This set is undoubtedly a museum quality item and if you happened to be a Museum curator or a private collector you will need to move fast to secure them for your collection.

2492
Private Purchase Flying Helmet - Click for the bigger picture SoldPrivate Purchase Flying Helmet - An original period flying or motoring helmet that probably dates from the 1920's and was purchased by us from a retired Tiger Moth pilot who last used it in the 1980's. Constructed in soft tan leather it remains in remarkably good condition with no issues to report and just the odd mark or stain that adds to the vintage patination. The helmet has triangular cut outs for the ears with wind deflection scoops mounted in a rear facing position. The brow of the helmet carries a small peak.

Inside is lined in tan cloth and is again in excellent original condition. It carries no makers label so we are unable to ascertain who made this one but it is typical of private purchase flying or motoring helmets of the early post war period and used into the 1930's. The chin strap and buckle remain sound. Whilst no size is marked it is a decent size and we would guess equates to an RAF size 3 or 4 helmet and would fit a head of about 60 cm or 7.5". Like the other helmet we have listed today this too would be the perfect accessory for your classic car or aircraft or the finishing touch for all those vintage events you will be attending this summer!

5220
RFC Goggles Mask Flying Mk II - Click for the bigger picture SoldRFC Goggles Mask Flying Mk II - In the early days of aviation flight clothing was often adapted from civilian or motoring apparel and the practice continued into the early years of WWI. In the case of goggles many were private purchase and the mask model gave excellent face protection when used in conjunction with the RFC cowl helmet. By 1916/17 the WD started issuing an official flying goggles which were designated the Mk I, stores reference 22C/10 which were fitted with clear lenses and the Mk II, stores reference 22C/11, which were identical but featured tinted lenses. The same pattern was also sold by Triplex as a private purchase item post war and was used up until the 1930's. Clearly the issue ones are the most desirable, scarce and as a result the most expensive to purchase today. Here we have a more or less text book example of this pattern.

The leather face mask remains supple and retains most of its original brown finish. To the left side and printed in gold leaf is the googles designation 'Goggles mask Flying Mk II' so these are the tinted lens option; the lenses are without damage and are not suffering from fogging as is normally the case. The manufacturers details are also shown as being 'The Triplex Mask & Lens Co Ltd' followed by the all important RFC property mark of a War Department Broad Arrow and an 'A ', designating the Air Branch, so no doubts this is a genuine RFC issue set. Clearly with use the gold leaf stamping invariably wears off or fades so this set is exceptional and the designation remains crisp and clear despite the 100 + years since it came out of the factory. The metal lens frame is blackened; early examples had chrome or nickel frames and the black variant was introduced to prevent glare. The classic 'teardrop ' shape will be recognised in the next development of RAF goggles of the 1930's, also confusingly referred to as Mk II goggles, which remained in service until the Battle of Britain despite being technically superseded by the less favoured Mk III and IIIA patterns. A patent number 116597 is stamped into the frame. Inside the mask is lined with leather and fur trimming to around the lenses. The back strap is a simple adjustable elastic strap that shows some age wear and stretching but remains sound.

In summary a very fine and desirable RFC issue example that rarely turn up for sale in any condition so grab them whilst you can.

6738
RAF K Type Dinghy Hand Paddles - Click for the bigger picture SoldRAF K Type Dinghy Hand Paddles - Standard issue with the fighter pilot's K type single seat dinghy in WWII. These were issued against stores reference number 27C/1906 and were constructed from rubber stretched over a simple metal frame.

The user would insert his hands and wrist between the paddle and the elastic retaining bands and use to propel the dinghy through the water. This is a good matched pair stamped with both stamped CQD 1096/3 and further stamps reading R.F.D.38 'RFD' indicating this set was made by 'RFD, which represents the company founder Reginald Foster Dagnall, who established the business in 1920. The reverse side is marked '35'. These are a matched pair and in excellent issued condition with just minor wear to the elastic section and age related storage marks.

4467
Air Ministry Night Simulation Epidiascope Attachment - Click for the bigger picture SoldAir Ministry Night Simulation Epidiascope Attachment - In a lifetime of collecting RAF memorabilia we have never seen one of these before. Whilst at school in the 1960's I remember the Epidiascope being used to project images, text from books and photographs onto a white screen ; 50 years ago this all seemed very 'high tec' to myself and my classmates! The example we have here is rather special. It is nicely Air Ministry (A.M.) marked and carries reference nos 14A/3039 with '14A' being the RAF parlance for all camera equipment. It is also embossed 'NIGHT SIMULATION ATTACHMENT FOR EPIDIASCOPES USE WITH WHITE SCREEN AT 18 FT'. The instrument was clearly designed to be mounted over the epidiascopes lens and by altering the central slide filter made up of clear, opaque and dark glass different conditions could be simulated. The filter is marked 'Slide Out' for full moon, 'Slide In' for half moon and 'Flap Down' to simulate starlight -we assume when no moon. A pointer is attached to the filter top and this in turn can be read off on the top of the instrument depending on climatic conditions and height. So using the filter it was possible to project target photographs taken in daylight and simulate how the same view would look at night having factored in weather conditions, the state of the moon, general visibility and aircraft height. What makes this example potentially even more interesting is a typed label has been attached inside reading 'Nuremberg Raid March 30/31st 1944.' The RAF Bomber Command raid on Nuremberg on 30-31 March 1944 resulted in the highest number of aircrew losses for any single operation in World War 2. Out of 779 bombers sent to attack 105 did not return. 534 airmen made the final sacrifice and a further 157 were captured. We have no way of proving if this instrument was used at the Nuremburg briefing but if it was it makes it an item of significant historical appeal. The dark filter shows some age wear but everything is in place with the body being made from black painted brass. It would certainly make a unique addition to a Bomber Command collection or a perfect display item if you happened to own a 1940's Ross military Epidiascope! Measures 7" across (18 cm)
6638
RAF Spitfire 2 Way Ignition Magneto Switchbox - Click for the bigger picture SoldRAF Spitfire 2 Way Ignition Magneto Switchbox - Another item that is now becoming increasingly hard to source. This is the classic short toggle type as fitted to the Spitfire and Hurricane, as well as wide variety of RAF aircraft of the WWII era including the Tempest and Typhoon. It should not be confused however with the long toggle type that is more associated with the heavies.

This 2-way ignition switch box, is clearly marked on the case 'SWITCHBOX 2 WAY IGNITION' and 'Ref. No. 5C/548', and is located in the pilots instrument panel and forms an integral part of for starting the Merlin Engine. It is also marked with a crisp Kings Crown and A.M. below whilst one end of the case carries and ink stamp 'MK' with a '2' below. The brass front face is clearly annotated MAGNETO no 1 and No2 with 'ON' being in the up position and 'Off' in the down ; below the 'off' is painted in STI/ELEC/8. The switch springs are perhaps not as crisp as they once were but operate perfectly well but this item is for sale as a collectable and it can not be guaranteed for its original purpose. It would of course make a perfect addition to a Spitfire or Hurricane replica instrument panel or cockpit project.

Prices on these switch boxes are going up all the time and we have seen similar currently listed at £187 and an eyewatering £285! Ours is rather more modestly priced so grab it whilst you can as we have no more once this has gone.

6632
Air Ministry Inclinometer Reference 6A/389 - Click for the bigger picture SoldAir Ministry Inclinometer Reference 6A/389 - Officially called a 'Fore-and-Aft Level, Type B' these were first described in the 1934 edition of AP1275. The type 'B' variant superseded the Type 'A' which was used on RNAS aircraft during the 1914-18 war. This updated version was significantly lighter and was used in a variety of RAF aircraft of the 1930's, including the DH82 Tiger Moth, Bristol Bulldog, Gloucester Gladiator and many more. It remained in service until the more sophisticated blind flying instruments panels were introduced which included an Artificial Horizon.

This example is in really crisp original condition with a white oblong dial graduated clearly from zero in the centre indicating flat and level flight. It then caries a scale going up to 20 degrees in a climb and 20 degrees in a dive so effectively the instrument gave a visual indication of the angle of the aircraft through the air and effectively worked in the same way as a spirit level, but in the vertical plane. The 'A' version of instrument originally contained a red dye but this was found prone to fading so was uprated with a black dye on later models. The dye is still present in this example and whilst we can't warrant its accuracy it seems to work as was intended back in the 1930's. It is made from what looks like Bakelite and is fully stamped with REF. No. 6A/389, a Kings Crown, A.M. and a serial number 145752. On the reverse of the dial is an ink manufacturers or inspectors stamp ; we are unsure who made this example but the main makers were either Short & Maison or Reid & Sigrist Ltd. The dial measures 5.5" (14 cm).These instruments are becoming increasingly difficult to find now so grab the opportunity whilst it is available. It is the first one of the kind we have had in for a considerable time and when it is gone it is gone!

1337
Bristol Blenheim Mk I Trench- Art Model - Click for the bigger picture SoldBristol Blenheim Mk I Trench- Art Model - The iconic fighter bomber of the early years of WWII and quite a scarce subject for a trench art model. Clearly period and hand made the brass has a lovely bronzy patina to it. We stand to be corrected by the Blenheim aficionados but we believe this to be an early Mk I and features the classic stubby nose characteristic of the type. Built by Bristol Aeroplane Company as a light bomber and was used extensively in the first two years of WWII including the battle of Britain, where it took heavy casualties.

The Type first flew in April 1935 and delivery to RAF squadrons commenced in1937. The Blenheim was one of the first British aircraft with an all-metal stressed-skin construction, retractable landing gear, flaps, a powered gun turret and variable-pitch propellers and The Mk I was faster than most fighters in the late 1930's. Development in fighters however lead to significant losses in the daylight role and it was decided that the Mk IF would be relegated to night fighter duties where it had better success. Our model is mounted on an unusually squat brass stand and it has never had propellers fitted and thus gives a convincing impression of the machine flying low and fast showing off the Bristol Mercury VIII radial piston engines to their best advantage. Wingspan measures 9" (22.5 cm) and it stands 2" high (5 cm) measured to the top of the tail fin

6636
RAF Air Speed Indicator Mk IXA - Click for the bigger picture SoldRAF Air Speed Indicator Mk IXA - The Mk IXA instrument (the 'A' signifying the dial is non-luminous) entered service in the 1930'sand replaced the V series of instruments and was the first to have a bakerite case and was standard fit in most British aircraft in WWII. Numerous versions were made each with a different speed scale; in this instance the speed is marked in M.P.H. as opposed to Knots and the scale runs from 2-240 MPH. This indicates this is an early instrument as on later ones the scale commenced at 5MPH. The branch connecting tubes emerge from the back of the dial which is nicely stamped with a Kings Crown and A.M. as well as a patent number. This instrument would have been fitted to a variety of aircraft but definitely the RAF Auster 1V & V. Whilst this instrument is offered for sale as a collectors item only it does still have an RAF Returned Equipment ticket attached which indicates when last checked it was pronounced 'Serviceable' by the assessing officer. Dial bezel dimension 3.6" (9.3 cm)
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